Tag: IPOs


FAST Act Amendments to the U.S. Securities Laws

Nicolas Grabar is a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP focusing on international capital markets and securities regulation. This post is based on a Cleary Gottlieb publication by Mr. Grabar, Les Silverman, and Andrea M. Basham.

On December 4, 2015, President Obama signed into law the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (the “FAST Act”), which, among other legislation in its 1300+ pages, includes several bills designed to facilitate the offer and sale of securities. In this post we focus on two of those bills. The first provides additional accommodations related to the SEC registration process for emerging growth companies (“EGCs”), a category of issuer established by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (the “JOBS Act”) in 2012. The second creates a non-exclusive safe harbor under Section 4 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) for resales of securities that meet the conditions of the safe harbor.

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FAST Act: Capital Formation Changes and Reduced Disclosure Burdens

Stacy J. Kanter is co-head of the global Corporate Finance practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP. This post is based on a Skadden alert by Ms. Kanter, David J. Goldschmidt, Michael J. Zeidel, and Brian V. Breheny.

On December 4, 2015, President Obama signed into law the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act), which, despite its name, contains several new provisions designed to facilitate capital formation and reduce disclosure burdens imposed on companies under the federal securities laws. The provisions build upon the 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (JOBS Act), which created a new category of issuers called “emerging growth companies” (EGCs) [1] and sought to encourage EGCs to go public in the United States. [2] The FAST Act provisions, which were first introduced in a package of bills often called “JOBS Act 2.0,” are the culmination of a continuing congressional effort to increase initial public offerings (IPOs) by EGCs, reduce the burdens on smaller companies seeking to conduct registered offerings and provide trading liquidity for securities of private companies.

While some of the new provisions require rulemaking by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) before they are effective, other provisions of the FAST Act amend the Securities Act itself and therefore are effective, with an immediate effect on current offerings.

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Legislation to Facilitate Capital Formation

Joseph A. Hall  is a partner and head of the corporate governance practice at Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP. This post is based on a Davis Polk memorandum authored by Mr. Hall, Alan F. DenenbergMichael Kaplan, Richard D. Truesdell, Jr., and Michele Luburich.

[December 1, 2015], conference committee members for the House and Senate agreed on a five-year transportation bill. While this type of legislation is rarely of interest to participants in the capital markets, the bill includes several provisions that will improve upon the JOBS Act and facilitate capital formation transactions. The legislation is expected to be voted on by the House and Senate this week as lawmakers prepare to send a final bill to President Obama for signature before December 4.

The capital formation legislation was attached to the House version of the transportation bill in early November and was preserved without further modification by a conference committee tasked with reconciling the House and Senate proposals. The capital formation measures (which appear in the last section of the proposed bill, under Division G—Financial Services) include the following:

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2016 Proxy Advisor Policy Changes

Shirley Westcott is a Senior Vice President at Alliance Advisors, LLC. This post is based on an Alliance Advisors whitepaper. The complete publication, including footnotes, is available here.

In preparation for the 2016 proxy season, proxy advisors Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) and Glass Lewis & Co. have issued updates to their proxy voting guidelines, which take effect for annual meetings held on or after Feb. 1, 2016 (ISS) and Jan. 1, 2016 (Glass Lewis). [1] The policy changes and their expected impact on issuers are discussed in more detail in Alliance Advisors’ November newsletter.

The key revisions deal with various situations where the proxy advisors recommend against directors. These include the following:

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ISS and Glass Lewis Updated 2016 Voting Policies

Ellen Odoner and Lyuba Goltser are partners in the Public Company Advisory Group of Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. This post is based on a Weil publication by Ms. Odoner, Ms. Goltser, and Reid Powell. The complete publication, including appendices, is available here.

ISS and Glass Lewis have released updates to their proxy voting policies for the 2016 proxy season. [1] ISS has also modified its QuickScore 3.0 Technical Document and Equity Plan Scorecard. [2] In this post we provide guidance for U.S. public companies on addressing these developments.

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On Secondary Buyouts

François Degeorge is Professor of Finance at the University of Lugano This post is based on an article authored by Professor Degeorge; Jens Martin, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of Amsterdam; and Ludovic Phalippou, Associate Professor of Finance at Saïd Business School, Oxford University.

Twenty years ago, private equity (PE) firms seeking to exit sold their portfolio companies to another company in the same industry or organized an IPO. Nowadays, 40 percent of PE exits occur through secondary buyouts (SBOs), transactions in which a PE firm sells a portfolio company to another PE firm. The rise of SBOs has elicited concerns among PE investors (the limited partners with stakes in private equity funds): Does the rise of SBOs mean that PE firms have run out of investment ideas? Do SBOs create or destroy value for investors? Our paper, On Secondary Buyouts, forthcoming in the Journal of Financial Economics, provides answers to these questions.

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ISS Proposed 2016 Policy Changes

Howard B. Dicker is a partner in the Public Company Advisory Group of Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. This post is based on a Weil publication by Mr. Dicker, Lyuba Goltser, and Megan Pendleton. The complete publication is available here.

Yesterday [October 27, 2015], Institutional Shareholder Services released its key draft proposed proxy voting policy changes for the 2016 proxy season. ISS is seeking comments by 6:00 p.m. EDT on November 9, 2015. ISS expects to release its final 2016 policies on November 18, 2015. [1] The policies as updated will apply to meetings held on or after February 1, 2016.

Proposed Amendments to ISS Proxy Voting Policies for 2016

ISS’s proposed voting policy changes for U.S. companies would:

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Building a Dynamic Framework for Offering Reform

Mary Jo White is Chair of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The following post is based on Chair White’s recent Keynote Address at the 47th Annual Securities Regulation Institute. The full text, including footnotes, is available here. The views expressed in this post are those of Chair White and do not necessarily reflect those of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the other Commissioners, or the Staff.

I am very pleased to be here to help kick off the 47th Annual Securities Regulation Institute. As some of you know, I am no stranger to this program, nor is the SEC staff. I have participated since my early days as U.S. Attorney, and its tremendous success is largely due to its tireless organizers. For many years, that work was led by Anita Shapiro, who is now the President of PLI, along with Laura Shields. Laura has now taken over from Anita, and she will surely continue the program’s record of excellence. Thank you both for all that you do to make this program such a great one year after year.

I have selected a topic that I think is well-suited for a conference of such endurance and importance: how the Commission is building a more proactive and responsive regulatory framework to better assess the impact of regulatory changes on investors and issuers over time in the context of securities offerings. As your opening panelists will no doubt discuss, this important area has seen tremendous regulatory change over the last ten years, including significant new rules in the past year.

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ISS Global Policy Survey 2015-2016

Stuart H. Gelfond is a partner in the Corporate Department at Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP. This post is based on a Fried Frank publication authored by Mr. Gelfond, Amy L. Blackman, Donald P. Carleen, and Jared Heady.

Recently, Institutional Shareholder Services Inc. (“ISS”) released the results of its global policy survey for 2015-2016 (the “Survey”). [1] The Survey reflects the results of 421 responses from a combination of institutional investors, corporate issuers, asset managers, pension funds, mutual funds, endowments and others. Each year, ISS typically considers the results of its annual global policy surveys when formulating proposed amendments to its Proxy Voting Guidelines. Below, we discuss some of the highlights of the Survey which may be a prelude to changes to be made by ISS to its Proxy Voting Guidelines in its next update.

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Materiality as Pleading Obstacle

Brad S. Karp is chairman and partner at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP. This post is based on a Paul Weiss client memorandum.

Claims brought under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Act”) are typically challenging for defendants to dismiss. Some defendants may have affirmative defenses, but most of the Act’s provisions impose strict liability for alleged misstatements—meaning that a plaintiff need not plead scienter—and claims brought under the Act are subject to the relatively low pleading standard imposed by Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 8. Further, although plaintiffs suing under the Act must allege facts sufficient to show that the purported misstatements were material, courts are generally reluctant to dismiss for failure to plead this element because materiality is an inherently fact-bound inquiry.

Notwithstanding these principles, on September 29, 2015, the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (Oetken, J.) dismissed a putative class action brought under the Act on the ground that the complaint’s materiality allegations failed as a matter of law. The opinion provides valuable insights on how to defeat other Act claims on similar grounds. [1]

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